2

A Vietnamese Celebration In Dallas

So for the whole month of April I lived out of a suitcase and had not much time for blogging. It started with a trip to New York, followed by a quick stop in Dallas to see my parents.

IMG_1261 (1280x1280)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While I was there, they asked me to join them at a celebration of the founding fathers of Vietnam and the famous Trưng sisters.

IMG_1424 (1280x1280)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you are Vietnamese and female, I bet you have had days where you wish you could ride an elephant and lead some kind of revolution; it’s just in our blood.

The devoted volunteers of the Vietnamese American Community of Greater Dallas put on a wonderful ceremony, full of pomp and circumstance to commemorate our history and continued story in our adopted country.

IMG_1354 (1280x960)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_1350 (1280x1280)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_1436 (1280x960)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have probably been to hundreds of events like these over the years, with my father being one of the founding members of this organization. But this was a real treat to see him invited back to speak about the Kings Hùng.

IMG_1307 (1024x950)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

He was also briefly interviewed by a (very tall!) broadcaster for a Vietnamese tv station:

IMG_1402 (1280x1280)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is it that they say, to know where you’re going you must understand where you came from? This April marks the 40th year that my family has been in our new country. Sometimes a quick history lesson is exactly what I need to continue the journey we have been on.

IMG_1293 (1280x1280)

Comments 2

  1. Post
    Author
    larkie

    hello KP! thanks for your lovely message. We all have such rich history running through our veins. It is probably one of the main reasons why I love to travel and find out more about the history of each place that I visit :).

  2. kp

    I had to look up the Trưng sisters on Wikipedia. What an amazing piece of history. It’s very cool that your father helps the community keep history alive.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *